Grand March

Couples assemble at rear of hall, then march in line around hall as directed.
Typically the dancers will follow the couple immediately in front of them and perform exactly the same movements in turn or to continue the pattern of the movement.

A Grand March can involve several movements/formations:

Serpentine: The couples march around the hall and the leading couple turns sharply and passes close to the oncoming line of dancers. The lines weave backwards and forwards as directed by the MC or caller. Typically this move is used to allow the "tail" of the march to clear the main floor area before the next movement is commenced.

Arbor or Gauntlet: As the dancers march around the hall the leading couple stops, steps apart and faces each other. The next couple behind them passes between the first couple, stops, steps apart and faces each other. Each couple in turn passes through the gap formed by the couples in front and stops, steps apart and turns to face each other. When every couple has passed through the leading couple, the leading couple  resumes the March by taking inside hands again and marching through the lines assembled in front of them.
In some formations, the couples may form arches rather than standing apart, this may prove awkward with voluminous dresses.

Single file: The dancers separate and march in single file around the perimeter of the dance floor. This movement usually requires two laps of the hall to be ready for the next movement.

Diagonals: The dancers either singly or in couples (as directed) march diagonally across the floor from the rear corners to the front corners.
In the centre of the hall, alternate the crossovers as the lines cross through each other.

Platoon: Couples lead up the centre of the hall and cast alternately to left and right and march down the outside towards the rear of the hall. As the two lines of couples approach each other at the centre rear of the hall they turn towards the stage and march in lines of two couples towards the front of the hall. Near the front of the hall the lines of four cast alternately to left and right and march down the outside towards the rear of the hall. As the two lines of four approach each other at the centre rear of the hall they turn towards the stage and march in lines of eight towards the stage. This is generally the conclusion of the Grand March and has couples organised into sets of 4 in preparation for the next dance.

Dance Description Copyright Don Richmond  2002
This may be reproduced for self-educational purposes.
Prepared for Subscription Ball August 2002
Last updated June 19, 2002